Empowering Women for Healthy Aging

GCOA is proud to launch our new report titled, Empowering Women for Healthy Aging: Key Policy Actions to Address Health Challenges Across the Life Course, which calls on policy and health system leaders to advance gender equality and economic growth by empowering women to achieve healthy aging.

Women’s access to quality healthcare and their economic participation are inextricably linked. As women are indispensable leaders in the economy, their communities, and their families, pursuing good health at each stage of the life course must be a target of policymakers and healthcare systems. Doing so can empower women to live long, healthy lives, from youth through old age, and enable their full participation in their economies.

The new report comes during a milestone year. 2020 marks the 25th anniversary of the Beijing Declaration on Women’s Rights, the 10th anniversary of UN Women’s foundation, and the commencement of the WHO Decade of Healthy Ageing, central to the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

The report offers recommendations for policymakers and healthcare systems:

  • Support research to better understand women’s lifelong health needs and risks, in childbearing years and as they age, including by increasing participation in research and clinical trials.
  • Provide educational resources for women of childbearing age to make healthier choices throughout the life course, supporting prevention and promotion of healthy aging.
  • Train healthcare providers and educate caregivers on delivery of integrated, person-centered care for women throughout their lives.
  • Implement national screening and prevention programs for conditions particularly affecting and/or under-diagnosed in aging women, which today are often ignored until an acute event.
  • Integrate global women’s rights with healthy and active aging – prioritizing women’s health and ability in each of the Decade of Healthy Ageing focus areas.

Latest Developments

We keep our members and partners in touch with the most recent updates and opinions in the worldwide dialogue on population longevity and related issues.

Health Equity Promise and That Innovation Thing

President Biden has pledged his administration to defeat cancer, Alzheimer’s, and other diseases that target America’s aging population. To achieve these lofty goals, bold words must be backed up by bold actions.

Roundtable Report Highlights Importance of Immunizing Canada’s Caregivers Against Influenza, Identifying Challenges and Opportunities to Protect This Critical Group

The Global Coalition on Aging (GCOA) today released a report summarizing key insights from an expert roundtable on vaccinating Canada’s caregivers against influenza. The roundtable, held virtually, brought together leading Canadian health policy experts, family caregivers, patient advocacy groups, aging experts, and other thought leaders to discuss challenges and strategies to reach this critically important yet hard-to-reach group.

Women, Work, Wellness, and That Aging Thing…

The OECD Forum’s virtual event Women at The Frontline of the Recovery will presciently focus attention among policymakers and the public stakeholders alike on the unique relationship between the age demographic mega-trend and the essential policies needed for OECD economies to emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Headlines of the Future Podcast: Decoding Healthy Aging

How can advancements in science and medicine make it possible for individuals to enjoy greater health and activity in their later years? For health leaders and organizations such as the Global Coalition on Aging, ensuring individuals can truly shine in their "Golden Years" is a matter of revisiting education and communication strategies, advancing digital health technologies and expanding access to healthcare innovation.

Longer Lifespans Require Secure Financial Futures

As many as half of 5-year-olds in the United States can now expect to live to 100, a population that is projected to swell in the decades ahead. Longer lifespans don’t guarantee a financially secure later life, however. If anything, in the absence of significant planning, extreme longevity may make financial security harder to attain.