New Paper Calls for Adult Vaccine Quality Measures

Michael Hodin Joins Former U.S. Surgeon General and Other Experts as Co-Author of Adult Vaccines Access Coalition Report

NEW YORK (August 1, 2016) – In a new white paper, The Value and Imperative of Quality Measures for Adult Vaccines, renowned experts across health, aging and immunization, including Michael Hodin, CEO of the Global Coalition on Aging, explain how vaccine quality measures can prevent illness and death, reduce caregiving demands, save unnecessary healthcare spending, and set the foundation for healthy aging. The paper urges that adult vaccination quality measures should be included in the implementation of two national measure developments underway in the United States: the Medicare Access & CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) and the Core Quality Measures Collaborative.

Every year, more than 40,000 U.S. adults are hospitalized or die due to vaccine-preventable diseases. In addition, vaccine-preventable diseases cost the U.S. billions each year. Nevertheless, adult vaccination rates remain far below national targets. Improving rates of adult vaccination is a national imperative. Higher vaccination rates among adults reduce clinic visits, the rate of hospitalizations, and the incidence of long-term disability. Higher vaccination rates also save money by preventing lost productivity from employee sick days.

Hodin’s co-authors include James Appleby, RPH, MPH, Executive Director and CEO, The Gerontological Society of America; David Satcher, MD, PhD, Former Surgeon General of the United States; William Schaffner, MD, Medical Director, National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, Professor of Preventive Medicine, Department of Health Policy, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; and LJ Tan, PhD, Chief Strategy Officer, Immunization Action Coalition.  Eleanor Perfetto, PhD, Professor of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, also contributed to the report.

“Older adults have a great deal to contribute to society and the economy, but they can only do so if they are able to remain healthy and active,” said Hodin. “With 78 million of us reaching the age of 65, we must increase awareness and uptake of vaccines for older adults. Adult vaccines are becoming an increasingly important and cost-effective means to safeguard the health, wellbeing, and productivity of this fast-growing segment of the U.S. population and the communities in which they live.”

Latest Developments

We keep our members and partners in touch with the most recent updates and opinions in the worldwide dialogue on population longevity and related issues.

Building the Caregiving Workforce an Aging World Needs

We will learn many lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic, but one of the most urgent and obvious is the vulnerability of older populations to serious public health risks. Across OECD countries, nearly half of all COVID-19 deaths happened in care facilities and nursing homes—yet less than 1% of the population lives in those facilities. COVID-19 demonstrated that the best place for all citizens to stay safe and healthy, especially aging adults, is in the home. And the vast majority of the older population—80% according to AARP—prefer it. When—or if—they have that option.

The 21st-Century Employer Must Be a Steward of Public Health

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, forward-looking business leaders and employers were focused on the global mega-trend of aging as an essential factor in their talent strategy. Now, the pandemic has only underscored the critical importance of aging for every business.

GCOA Report Examines the Role of Inflammation in the Aging Process, as an Indicator of Other Health Challenges, and as a Needed Focus of Integrated Care

29 June 2021 – The Global Coalition on Aging (GCOA) today released a report, A Proactive Approach to Healthy Aging: The Role of Inflammation Control & Integrated Care, which examines how targeting chronic inflammation and chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs) can contribute to healthy aging around the world. The report’s findings were highlighted at Women Political Leaders (WPL) Summit 2021 today during a panel titled “WPL Policy Toolkit – Women’s health through their life-course.”

New Report Calls for Employers to Have an Internal Public Health Strategy to Navigate the Aging Post-Pandemic World

25 June 2021 – The Global Coalition on Aging (GCOA) today released a new report, Employers’ Role in the COVID-19 Environment: Winning in the Vastly Changed World of Work. It highlights the unique convergence between the megatrend of aging and the COVID-19 pandemic in the workplace and offers insights to inform employers’ public health and workforce strategies at this intersection.  Chief among the report’s key findings is the guidance to all employers “to elevate public health as a central feature of their culture and embed it into management.”

New Index Ranking 11 Countries’ Ability to Tackle Rising Threat of Resistance to Antimicrobials Shows Need for Urgent Action

New York, NEW YORK and Washington, DC (June 23, 2021) – Today the Global Coalition on Aging (GCOA) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) launched the first-ever global AMR Preparedness Index, a first-of-its-kind evaluation of how the governments of the 11 largest global economies are living up to their commitments to address antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

Global Alliance on Heart Failure & Healthy Aging Unveils New Report Projecting Sharp Rise in Heart Failure Mortality Linked to Population Aging and Missed or Late Diagnosis

New York, NY – June 10, 2021 – Today, the Global Alliance on Heart Failure and Healthy Aging unveiled a new report, Undiagnosed Heart Failure: A Growing Public Health Risk and Looming Financial Iceberg for Aging Societies. The report examines the link between aging and heart failure, recognizing that a significant portion of heart failure deaths occurs in the older population.

Ageism: how age discrimination can be fought in society and the workplace – but older people have to stop believing the stereotypes first

Ageism is something that’s likely to affect everybody as they grow older and it should be treated as seriously as other “isms”, such as racism and sexism. That was the main takeaway from a recent “Solutions to Combat Ageism” webinar, organised in New York by the Global Coalition on Ageing, which aims to educate and drive change to improve older people’s health, productivity and social engagement.