Global Coalition on Aging to Be Honored by American Federation for Aging Research

GCOA and AFAR Celebrate Innovation in Aging

NEW YORK CITY (April 15, 2013) – This evening Michael W. Hodin, PhD, executive director of the Global Coalition on Aging (GCOA), will receive the Fred D. Thompson Award of Distinction from the American Federation for Aging Research (AFAR) at AFAR’s Annual Awards Dinner in New York City.

The award, named in honor of the founding chairman of AFAR’s Board of Directors, is presented to individuals who have demonstrated an outstanding commitment to the field of aging research through activities and support of those involved in the field.

“It is a high honor to be recognized by the American Federation for Aging Research, an organization that is playing such a critical role in advancing our knowledge of and innovation around healthy aging,” said Hodin.  “I will proudly accept this award on behalf of all of the members, advisors and staff of the Global Coalition, who are so steadfastly committed to making aging a path for economic prosperity and personal wellbeing.”

Each year, AFAR recognizes the achievements of individuals and organizations whose work has impacted the field of aging research and improved public health.  For more than 30 years, AFAR has supported the science of healthier aging and advanced the knowledge base of age-related diseases by providing grants to support biomedical research of nearly 3,000 talented scientists.

“In just over two years, the Global Coalition on Aging, with its optimistic perspective and innovative approach to business and public policy, has helped place the spotlight on the opportunities of healthy aging,” said Stephanie Lederman, executive director of AFAR. “AFAR congratulates Mike Hodin and the Global Coalition on Aging for its leadership in advancing the global dialogue on population aging and looks forward to working together as we strive to meet our mutual goals.”

“Through Mike’s energy, enthusiasm and amazing networks, he has led the Global Coalition to become a real leader in the field of aging. It is incredible success for such a small organization to have achieved on such a crucial issue for our times,” said John Beard, Director of the Department of Ageing and Life Course at the World Health Organization.  “Our capacity to exert global influence on aging would be much less if Mike and the Global Coalition had not been such a close and supportive partner.”

This evening’s AFAR dinner will also honor Brian Daniels, MD, Senior Vice President, Global Development and Medical Affairs at Bristol-Myers Squibb and include a posthumous tribute to George Doty, a founding member of AFAR’s Board, and his wife Marie.

In conjunction with the AFAR Annual Awards Dinner, AFAR and GCOA are hosting an afternoon symposium titled “Innovation and the Future of Healthy Aging,” bringing together some of world’s leading business executives and academics driving changes centered on healthy aging.  Topics to be discussed include nutrition, technology and policy and investment.  Speakers include:

  • Richard W. Besdine, MD, AFAR Medical Officer and Professor of Medicine and of Health Services, Alpert Medical School of Brown University
  • Caroline Blaum, MD, Division of Geriatrics, New York University
  • Joseph Coughlin, Director, AgeLab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • William Green, Director, Public Affairs & Relations, Nutricia (Danone)
  • Jennifer Grossman, Senior Vice President, Dole Nutrition Institute
  • Michael Hodin, Executive Director, Global Coalition on Aging
  • Shawn Morris, President of Development and Innovation, HealthSpring (Cigna)
  • Robert Romasco, President, AARP
  • Paul Simonetti, Consultant, Health & Wellness
  • Jack Watters, Vice President, External Medical Affairs, Pfizer

Latest Developments

We keep our members and partners in touch with the most recent updates and opinions in the worldwide dialogue on population longevity and related issues.

Women, Work, Wellness, and That Aging Thing…

The OECD Forum’s virtual event Women at The Frontline of the Recovery will presciently focus attention among policymakers and the public stakeholders alike on the unique relationship between the age demographic mega-trend and the essential policies needed for OECD economies to emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Headlines of the Future Podcast: Decoding Healthy Aging

How can advancements in science and medicine make it possible for individuals to enjoy greater health and activity in their later years? For health leaders and organizations such as the Global Coalition on Aging, ensuring individuals can truly shine in their "Golden Years" is a matter of revisiting education and communication strategies, advancing digital health technologies and expanding access to healthcare innovation.

Longer Lifespans Require Secure Financial Futures

As many as half of 5-year-olds in the United States can now expect to live to 100, a population that is projected to swell in the decades ahead. Longer lifespans don’t guarantee a financially secure later life, however. If anything, in the absence of significant planning, extreme longevity may make financial security harder to attain.

Financial Times Letter to the Editor

The call by Messrs Mario Draghi and Emmanuel Macron for a new growth strategy under France’s EU presidency should be guided by three principles aligned with their point about “demographic evolutions changing the structure of our societies” (Opinion, December 24).

Health Equity and Innovation Are at Risk for All of Us

The rapid development of COVID-19 vaccines illustrates what’s possible when federal policy fosters innovation with a real public-private partnership, especially for the health challenges facing America’s more than 54 million older adults. Yet, a number of drug-pricing policy proposals now jeopardize this very model, threatening to limit access to prescription drugs, compromise health equity and slow progress on urgently needed new treatments for age-related chronic conditions.